pervious concrete

Caltrans Pervious Concrete Workshop

Caltrans Pervious Concrete Workshop

Over the several years BAPC's David Liguori has worked with Caltrans to update their pervious concrete design guidelines and specifications. Recently, he and the California Nevada Cement Association were asked by Caltrans District 4 to provide a pervious concrete workshop for their material, pavement, stormwater, and highway engineers.

The three hour workshop provided 28 Caltrans engineers with the latest developments in pervious concrete system design, specifications, and best management practices. Afterwards attendees were bursting with ideas and projects where pervious concrete would help solve their stormwater design issues. They expressed how grateful they were that our presentation was technical, detail-oriented and highly educational, not just a fluffy sales-pitch.

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You're Invited to the Holloway St Walking Tour - Nov 2nd

You're Invited to the Holloway St Walking Tour - Nov 2nd

Need a good reason to get out of the office? Want to learn more about green infrastructure and pervious concrete? Join the ASCE Sustainability Committee on November 2nd, 12:00-1:30pm, for a guided walking tour of the Holloway Green Street project, led by Mike Adamow of SFPUC. Register on Eventbrite.

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Holloway Green Street - Pervious Concrete Installation

Holloway Green Street - Pervious Concrete Installation

We have finally begun to install the pervious concrete on the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) Holloway Green Street Project! The project involves eight blocks of new streetscape along Holloway Street. The green street improvements include both permeable pavement and rain gardens to manage stormwater through local infiltration. One of the reasons this is such an exciting project is it's the first use of pervious concrete in a public right-of-way in San Francisco. 

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Presentation Series: Planning with Pervious Concrete

Want to learn why pervious concrete is the most cost effective stormwater BMP? Bay Area Pervious Concrete's David Liguori will be providing a series of informational presentations in February and March. By attending the following events you will learn how a pervious concrete stormwater system can simplify your site designs, decrease project costs, while complying with municipal stormwater regulations. 

Bay Area Pervious Concrete

Planning with Pervious Concrete

February 3rd, 11:45am-1:00pm
APWA-Sacramento Chapter Luncheon
Dante Club, 2330 Fair Oaks Boulevard, Sacramento , CA , 95825


Pervious concrete stormwater management systems, which operate according to a principle known as LATIS, or Large Area Thin Infiltration Systems, are considerably more effective and less costly than other BMPs when designed appropriately. A 180° departure from conventional design, LATIS requires a major re-think. This presentation illustrates this new design approach and walks participants through the building of a system model to reduce overall project costs, while complying with regulations. Register here.

PERVIOUS CONCRETE 2.0: Beyond the Basics

March 8th, 11:45am-1:00pm
East Bay Municipal Engineers Lunch Meeting
Legends at Diablo Creek, 4050 Port Chicago Hwy, Concord, CA 94520

Have you attended the introductory presentation and feel like you know enough to be dangerous? Take it to the next level and join us while we dive deeper into the details of designing and specifying a Pervious Concrete water management system based on LATIS ( Large Area Thin Infiltration System). We will go through the latest specifications released in the fall of 2016, take apart several designs, study various details, cover base and subgrade prep as well as the finer aspects of infiltration.

 This presentation will give you what you need to put pen to paper and supercharge, by simplifying, your site design. Register here

 

Can’t make it to one of these events? Have your organization’s lunch and learn coordinator contact us to schedule a presentation at your office.

Want to Improve your Low-Impact Development Projects? Take This Tour.

Want to Improve your Low-Impact Development Projects? Take This Tour.

Santa Cruz County is providing a tour of five of its recent low-impact development projects. At each stop on the tour you will be able to gain insights from the project managers, engineers, architects and contractors that worked on the projects. In addition, the tour features Bay Area Pervious Concrete's installation at Heart of Soquel Park. David Liguori will be at the Heart of Soquel Park tour stop to talk about the pervious concrete courtyard and parking lot we installed at the park in 2015. 

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Don't Let This Godzilla El Niño Smash Up Your City - Protect It with Pervious Concrete

Don't Let This Godzilla El Niño Smash Up Your City - Protect It with Pervious Concrete

The last time that the category of El Niño was considered Very Stong was the winter of 1997-1998, where many California communities suffered from mudslides and flooding. This year's El Niño is showing signs that it could be even stronger. There is a strong chance that the Bay Area could see as much as twice the annual precipitation, maybe above 40 inches of rain. This could greatly impact the state by damaging homes, disrupting transportation systems, schools, and businesses - potentially costing state residents billions of dollars. Many cities are preparing for the additional rainfall by cleaning out their waterways and storm systems.  California officials are warning people to prepare for potential flooding conditions. You may be asking, "What can I do to reduce the risk of flooding for my home or business?"

One thing you can do is by replacing sidewalks, driveways, parking lots, patios, and roads with pervious concrete. Luckily, installing pervious concrete is one type of El Niño preparation you may be able to receive a rebate for. Saving you money upfront and in the long run!

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Pervious Concrete Has Been Supporting Heavy Loads, Tire Abrasion and Freeze-Thaw Cycles for Years

Pervious Concrete Has Been Supporting Heavy Loads, Tire Abrasion and Freeze-Thaw Cycles for Years

Over the past few weeks we have seen the internet explode with interest over the recently announced Topmix Permeable concrete from Tarmac Lafarge in the UK. People are marveling over concrete that allows water to not only go through it, and back into the ground, but at an incredible rate. The video we featured on our last blog post is impressive and demonstrated just how fast. We were excited to see so much interest in pervious concrete by so many different people. However, we did notice some discrepancies in the way that pervious concrete was discussed in some of the media outlets, and we wanted to take some time to clarify a couple things.

Some of the media outlets portrayed pervious concrete as a new product that was not available in the United States - which is false. Pervious concrete has been used for stormwater management throughout the US for over 40 years. What's different, or innovative, about Tarmac's Topmix Permeable concrete is it boasts a whopping 35% air void space, which is why it infiltrates at such a high rate.  Tarmac representatives have stated in interviews that the product has some limitations on where, and when, it should be used. They are not recommending Topmix Permeable for high-traffic areas, in places where vehicles make lots of tight turns, or in places with freeze-thaw cycles, as it will eventually start breaking up the surface layer. Some media corespondents have portrayed that all pervious concrete had these limitations - which is also false. While Topmix Permeable may have these limitations, more traditional pervious concrete does not share the same limitations.  In the US, mix designs have evolved and have already solved the issues of heavy traffic, weight loads, turning vehicle traffic, and freeze/thaw cycles. 

Through trial and error the pervious concrete industry has discovered that 20% air void space provides the proper balance between strength, durability, and high infiltration rates. The additional bonds provided by only having 20% air voids, allows for a stronger, longer-lasting material, with just as much infiltration capacity to mitigate all of a site's stormwater. 

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Super Pervious Concrete - A Real Life Demonstration in Palo Alto, CA

Super Pervious Concrete - A Real Life Demonstration in Palo Alto, CA

The internet has been calling this pervious concrete "Super permeable" and Magical." If you agree, you don't have to travel to the UK to see it or have it! Bay Area Pervious Concrete has been installing super pervious concrete management systems for nearly a decade. This viral video, from  the UK firm Lafarge Tarmac, is a great representative of how fast pervious concrete can infiltrate water, but how does pervious concrete handle longer water events - like heavy rain storms? A real life test of pervious concrete. In our Stormwater Sleuthing video David compares two driveways after at least 12 hours of steady rainfall.

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Why Use Asphalt? In Morgan Hill They Use Pervious Concrete Curb to Curb

Why Use Asphalt? In Morgan Hill They Use Pervious Concrete Curb to Curb

When most people think of road pavement, they think of asphalt. The new East Dunne Ave housing development in Morgan Hill, CA decided to do something different. They had Bay Area Pervious Concrete install pervious concrete from curb to curb for the new Seville Drive. Pervious concrete works great for roadways. Pervious concrete roadways have a lifespan of 30-50 years before it may need to be replaced. They are largely maintenance free for their entire lifespan. The extra benefit of pervious concrete is that it is a stormwater management system that doubles as a pavement. 

Unlike pervious concrete roads, asphalt roadways have short lifespans, and require regular maintenance. Asphalt roads must be replaced, or resealed, every 10-15 years. This increases the maintenance necessary and inconvenience for residents. Typical asphalt roads also do not provide any stormwater management services. In fact they can actually contribute to poor stormwater management by concentrating pollutants that collect on the surface and rapidly shedding them into local waterways.

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Arana Gulch Trail - A Revisit

If you haven't been lucky enough to experience the renovated Arana Gulch Trail in Santa Cruz yet, you are in luck! Thanks to a video shot by Greg McPheeters, of People Power,  you can ride the trail from anywhere.

We are so happy that people are excited about the new trail and are sharing their experiences of it. If you have your own Arana Gulch trail photos to share we would love to see them.

Stormwater Sleuthing - Episode 1 - Woodside Runoff!

David Liguori went out into the field, during the last rain, to see what the stormwater runoff situation looked like in Woodside, California. Watch the video below to see what did and didn't run off!  

What did you think? Do you have a Stormwater Sleuthing location (in the Bay Area) that you would like David to investigate the next time it rains? Let us know in the comments below or contact us here. Thanks!